Looking for Festive Cocktails?

Are you looking for cocktail recipes for this holidays? This is “El Festivo”, with complex flavors, but refreshing and hoppy finish.

“El Festivo”
1.5 oz Casa Noble reposado tequila
0.5 oz Del Maguey Vida mezcal
2 dashes Orange bitters
1 oz Agave nectar
1 oz Lime juice (freshly squeezed)
1 oz of fresh orange juice.
One pinch of ground clove
Half bar spoon of grated Chocolate Abuelita
Topped with tamarind soda.
Garnished with orange wheel and grated Chocolate Abuelita.

Recipe by: @jaimeqiu

Advertisements

Agave Wine? Really?

A good friend told us he wanted to bring ‘Agave Wine’ to his restaurant and after some research, we came to the conclusion that there cannot be an agave wine as wine comes from the vid and its made from grapes. There may be an Agave distillate that can’t be called Tequila for a number of reasons, but not wine, as this brand calls its product. He finally got it and this is the one, what do you guys think?

http://laquintaagavewine.wordpress.com/the-creation-of-la-quinta-agave-wine/

http://www.facebook.com/La.Quinta.Agave.Wine?sk=info

Denominaciones de Origen en México

1.TEQUILA (1974)
2. MEZCAL (1994)
3. OLINALÁ ( 1994)
4. TALAVERA (1997)
5. CAFÉ VERACRUZ (2000)
6. BACANORA (2000)
7. ÁMBAR DE CHIAPAS (2000)
8. SOTOL (2002)
9. MANGO ATAULFO DEL SOCONUSCO DE CHIAPAS (2003)
10. CAFÉ DE CHIAPAS (2003)
11. CHARANDA (2003)
12. EL CHILE HABANERO (2008)
13. VAINILLA DE PAPANTLA (2009)

Encounter of Two Worlds

Tequila is the result of the encounter of two worlds. This are México and Spain, as it involves the agaves from Mexico and the distillation techniques from the European Continent.

When the Spaniards came to Mexico, they saw the natives drinking the fermented juices from the Agave and decided to bring their distillation techniques to ‘purify’ it and get a stronger spirit known as mezcal wine or ‘aguardiente’. They promoted the agave production and were the ones who laid the foundations for its elaboration.

Tequila’s Origin

Mayahuel was the fertility goddess and she was represented as the goddess with four hundred breasts. Quetzalcoatl ‘the feathered serpent’ fell in love with her and brought her down to earth to live with him. Tzintzimitl was Mayahuel’s grandmother and evil goddess; she did not approve this so she went looking for them until she killed Mayahuel.

Quetzalcoatl was so mad that flew back to the sky to take revenge and killed Tzintzimitl. He cried his lover’s death after every night on her grave. Other gods saw this and decided to grow a plant in her burial site. This plant would have hallucinogenic properties so he could drink the elixir from it and comfort his soul.

The legend says that some natives from Jalisco were hiding from a lightning storm inside a cave when a lightning stroke an agave plant cutting it in half and cooking it for them to try it. They later tried their fermented juices and noticed a personality change attributed as a gift from the gods.